Report back from Resisting the Market conference

Resisting the Market, Uniting for: Pay, Pensions, Democracy, Equality and Justice

Organised by UCU Transformed, UCU Left, Branch Solidarity Network and OurUCU

Saturday 13 October 2018

This was an inspiring conference bringing people together who have fought for pensions and pay and campaigned to reclaim their university, are fighting precarity, oppose racism on campus and want to bring all staff in-house.

100 people attended from around 50 university and college branches.

mark abel

Most of the day was made up of workshops hosted from a diversity of campaigns. The day ended with a general assembly and discussion of the success of the pensions and pay campaigns and how to win the coming battles including the pay ballot closing on the 19th.

Workshops

Deepa DriverThe morning workshops included a meeting on USS: Where next after the JEP report? The session was run by a USS Briefs team including Felicity Callard, Jo Grady, Jaya John, Deepa Driver (left) and Carlo Morelli, national negotiator.

There was a very informative presentation on Adult Education, Devolution and Apprenticeships. Forogh Rahmani, a senior policy advisor from the London Mayor’s office, outlined how they were preparing for the devolution of adult funding. It was refreshing to be in a dialogue with policy makers who are listening and want to engage with unions. A link will be available here to the presentation. Continue reading

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Post Congress Meeting, 9 June

After Congress: what next for UCU?

Open National Meeting for UCU members

Saturday 9 June, 2pm

Venue: G22 Lecture Theatre, Pearson Building, UCL.

The Pearson Building is in the UCL quad on the left as you enter. The entrance to the building is in the North corner of the quad.

Map | Nearest tube: Euston Square.
ucl-g22-lt-map
After the fallout of UCU Congress on Wednesday 30 May, 130 UCU delegates met and it was agreed that London Region UCU would call a National Meeting as soon as possible on:

  • UCU democracy
  • Campaigning in our sectors, how to build on motions passed at HE and FE sector conferences
  • What kind of union we want

After a year of transformative industrial action, UCU members are demanding discussion on where next for our disputes and union.

The strike action taken by UCU members in HE in defence of USS pensions has been inspirational. Some 40,000 lecturers, academic related staff, researchers and support staff have struck across 64 institutions. After a year of industrial  16,000 people have joined UCU. Many of these new members  are BAME, women and young members starting out their careers.

In FE colleges are involved in a campaign of escalating strike action in defence of their pay and conditions. There are another 146 branches that have submitted 168 claims to their employers that could form a second wave of action. This is 50% of all FE bargaining units across the UK. The claims range from, pay, casualisation, equal pay and workloads.

Hosted by London Region UCU. All UCU members welcome.

For clarity, this meeting will follow on from the London Region meeting which takes place the same day at Carlow Street.

Best wishes
Mandy Brown
UCU London Regional Secretary

Post-ballot Strike Co-ordinating Meeting, Monday 16 April, 6pm

What next after the e-ballot?

  • Date: Monday 16 April, 6pm
  • Location: UCL Cruciform Lecture Theatre 2

London Region UCU is organising an open meeting to discuss what next after the e-ballot, where reps and activists can come to discuss the next stage in the dispute. 

The USS ballot will close on Friday 13th and some branches are due to strike on Monday 16th. The result will be public, one way or another, by Saturday, and most likely by mid Friday afternoon.

If the vote is NO, several London branches will take a week of strike action from 23 April. We will need solidarity from branches that are not striking!

The larger the turnout and the greater the vote NO the easier it will be to put the action on.

Outside of London, some branches are set to strike from Monday 16th.

If the vote is YES, then industrial action will be stood down, and reps will want to discuss what we do next!

Facebook event

29 April: Planning meeting for UCU Anti-Casualisation Day 2014

Dear London Region colleague,

This year’s national Anti-Casualisation Day of Action is on 7 May.

At the last London Region meeting we agreed to build for a successful day.

We’ve organised a planning meeting for Tues 29th April at UCL.

flyer

From your branch, could you get a couple of your most active casualised / hourly paid colleagues to the meeting, along with a branch rep? We hope this will be a good opportunity for casualised colleagues to meet each other, get more involved and build for a successful campaigning day on 7 May.

The meeting is Tues 29 April 6.00pm.
UCL, Room B15, Darwin Building, Malet Place, WC1E 6BT
A map is below.

How to find the Darwin Building, UCL

How to find the Darwin Building, UCL

Zero tolerance for zero-hours contracts

Zero-hours contracts have no place in Higher Education

Wednesday November 13 2013, 5.30pm

Public Meeting

London Metropolitan University, GCG08
(Tower Building opposite Holloway Road Tube Station)

Speakers to include: John McDonnell MP (tbc), Liz Lawrence (Vice President UCU), Katherine West (Leader Labour Group Islington Council), John Fox (Branch Chair Bakers Union Hovis), Jane Thompson (UCU HPL National Officer) plus UCU Member Edinburgh University

Jointly organised by London Met UCU, UNISON and Students Union

In some universities as many as half of all staff are on zero hours contracts.

The revelation that Zero Hours contracts (where the contract does not name a minimum number of hours to be worked) are used in Higher Education will come as a shock to many. Such contracts have been widely publicised in industries such as clothing (Sports Direct) and food retail (MacDonalds) but their use in universities has until now been under- reported. In fact the Higher Education sector is the second most casualised in the UK! The widespread use of ‘Hourly-Paid Lecturers’(HPLs) by universities is one example of the practice but it also applies to many technical and admin staff.

Zero-hours contracts give the employee only minimal rights. They lack job security, proper facilities or holiday pay and many have no access to sick pay or opportunities for professional development. HPLs have little control over their job and can’t plan their working life as their timetable can be changed without warning. Yet they have to hold themselves ready for any work that is going. Both the HPLs and the students they teach lose out in this system which can result in cuts and course changes to suit management priorities without proper consultation.

But the trend towards zero hours can be stopped and reversed. UCU members in Edinburgh University have forced management to stop using such contracts and strike action at Hovis in Wigan won permanent contracts for casualised workers. Others can do the same. Join our campaign for decent contracts for all hourly paid lecturers at all Universities in London.

Come to the meeting at London Met and help develop a charter for zero-hours workers.

See also: